UPDATE SUNYADK / May 2019

The SUNY Adirondack monthly newsletter


NEW PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT

Jordan Sheldon, an Individual Studies major, tutors a student in the EOP office in Warren Hall.

Jordan Sheldon, an Individual Studies major, tutors a student in the EOP office in Warren Hall.

New degree gives students greater course flexibility

Offering a plethora of academic degrees to meet the diverse needs of prospective students can be a difficult challenge for a small community college, but a new program at SUNY Adirondack gives students more options and flexibility.

The college’s Liberal Arts Humanities & Social Sciences — Individual Studies degree makes it possible for students to create a customized associate degree based on their personal interests or academic needs.

The associate in science degree combines a strong liberal arts and sciences foundation with 30 credits of choice to help a student transfer in a direction previously not supported by many degree programs. Students in the program work closely with an advisor to design a customized four-semester layout.

Hannah Grady of Corinth, who plays on the college’s softball team, started college as a Liberal Arts major because she was undecided about her future career path. After some time at college, she connected her love of athletics with academics and switched to an Individual Studies major to make the most of the credits she had earned.

“I’ve decided to become a physical education teacher because I love working with kids,” Grady said. “As a teacher, I don't think I want to be in classroom all day. I like being hands-on in a gym. Physical education seemed like the best path for me.”

Grady graduates in May and plans to transfer to SUNY Cortland to study physical education. 

Jordan Sheldon of Hudson Falls switched his major to Individual Studies to optimize his financial aid availability, making it possible for him to take classes at SUNY Adirondack before graduation that will apply toward a bachelor degree program.

“I was able to knock out more prerequisites for my transfer,” said Sheldon, who graduates in May and plans to attend SUNY ESF in the fall. “SUNY Adirondack was close and convenient for me —and not expensive. I thought it was a great place to start.”

The degree can be especially helpful for returning adults and veterans, who may have started in one direction and now have a new focus. Individual Studies enables them to continue their studies without an undue loss of credit, making it easier to finish an associate degree more quickly and giving them the opportunity to transfer to a four-year college.

“The flexibility of the degree allows students to change their transfer plans without having a negative impact on their ability to complete an associate degree in four semesters. This happens quite often as students change their minds about four-year college majors and/or specific four-year colleges,” said Doug Gaulin, A SUNY Adirondack counselor who specializes in transfer advising. “The program also allows advisors and students the flexibility to plan for some of the non-traditional four-year degrees where we don't have a perfect fit at the associate degree level.”

Gaulin cites two career-specific concentrations as examples. A Music Industry concentration directly aligned to support transfer to SUNY Oneonta or SUNY Fredonia and combines music and business coursework with a foundation of liberal arts and sciences. A Sport Management concentration combines business and general education coursework to prepare students for transfer to obtain a bachelor’s from SUNY Cortland.

 

U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer talked about the important of Cybersecurity degree programs during a 2018 stop at SUNY Adirondack.

U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer talked about the importance of Cybersecurity degree programs during a 2018 stop at SUNY Adirondack.

Students learn tech needs in global economy

Jordan Suprenant of Fort Edward did some homework before choosing a degree program.

Suprenant had an interest in computers, and she wanted to choose a major that had a strong future.

“I did research on all the opportunities out there and found statistics for the increasing opportunities in cybersecurity,” Suprenant said.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a steep 28 percent growth rate for cybersecurity positions through 2026, which is 300 percent higher than the prediction for all occupations.

Suprenant was one of the first students to enroll in SUNY Adirondack’s new Information Technology: Cybersecurity program, a multifaceted discipline designed to meet a growing global need.

Students in the program learn theoretical and hands-on knowledge to identify network vulnerabilities and threats and how to counteract with the appropriate security controls to maintain confidentiality, integrity and the availability of data and systems. The curriculum harnesses content from certifications such as Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Security, CompTIA Security+ and EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker.

“I was surprised at how hands-on it is,” Suprenant said of the associate of applied science program. “In our ethical hacking class, we have a web-based virtual environment where we practice attacks and watch them go through. Then we mitigate against them to learn how a real hacker would launch an attack. The best way to understand them is to watch them and implement them.”

Choosing SUNY Adirondack made economic sense for Suprenant, but the depth of the two-year Cybersecurity program surprised her.

“Attending SUNY Adirondack, I’ve obviously been able to save a lot of money because I can commute. But I’ve also gotten great exposure to people who have worked in the field — and you get to network with those people. I've had job offers already,” said Suprenant, who graduates in May and plans to pursue a bachelor’s degree in cybersecurity at SUNY Plattsburgh’s main campus.

While the Cybersecurity degree prepares graduates for immediate entrance to the workforce, those seeking further education toward a four-year degree can seamlessly transfer to SUNY Empire State or Excelsior. Students may also transfer a majority of credits to other colleges, including SUNY Cobleskill, SUNY Plattsburgh, SUNY Poly, SUNY Morrisville, Utica College St. Rose and Rochester Institute of Technology.

 

Students get hands-on experience during a computer course included in the Information Security degree program curriculum, which introduces them to secure coding techniques, information assurance and network security.

Students get hands-on experience during a computer course included in the Information Security degree program curriculum, which introduces them to secure coding techniques, information assurance and network security.

Program offers diverse skills for tech careers

Alyssa Bell would like to see more diversity in the tech industry.

“Women getting into technology is a huge thing right now. I like the idea of being someone who pushes boundaries,” said Bell, a student in SUNY Adirondack’s recently launched Information Technology: Information Security program.

Information Security introduces students to secure coding techniques, information assurance and network security. A wide range of courses provide students with the fundamentals of secure coding practices, object oriented programming, information security, database design, data assurance and cyber operations.

“I love the professors. I think they are very talented and passionate, which is amazing to me. You can sit down and talk to them, and they are willing to help,” said Bell, who lives in South Glens Falls.

The curriculum offers an alternative path to students interested in Computer Science, providing a solid foundation for future study of IT-related content, including information assurance, application development, cyber operations and network security.

The new associate of science degree was designed to easily transfer after graduation to a four-year school, including bachelor’s programs at SUNY Canton and SUNY Polytechnic.

Bell, who also has a photography degree from the Rochester Institute of Technology, will graduate from the program in May.

“Since taking these courses, I feel like I have really changed as a person,” she said. “My approach to analyzing situations has grown dramatically. I am able to process things in a different way, and I find that really powerful. This experience has given me a lot of confidence.”

 

College modifies accounting degree

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 10 percent through 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. In response to the demand, the Business division has modified the college’s Accounting degree to an associate of science — making it more easily transferable for students wanting to continue their education after graduation to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Accounting graduates will now be able to transfer seamlessly to top accredited business schools, including Siena College, SUNY Albany and SUNY Plattsburgh.


IN THE NEWS

SUNY Adirondack Vice President of Enrollment and Student Affairs Robert Palmieri and SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson present 2019 Chancellor’s Award for Excellence to Crystal Curry, left, and Jae Ran Grandy, right, on April 24 in Albany.

SUNY Adirondack Vice President of Enrollment and Student Affairs Robert Palmieri and SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson present the 2019 Chancellor’s Award for Excellence to Crystal Curry, left, and Jae Ran Grandy, right, on April 24 in Albany.

Chancellor honors SUNY Adirondack students, faculty and staff

State University of New York Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson presented 210 SUNY students from across the state, including two students from SUNY Adirondack, with the 2019 Chancellor’s Award for Excellence on April 24 in Albany.

“Today’s award recipients emerged from their campuses this year as the top scholars, athletes, performers, and achievers, as well as a tremendous source of inspiration,” said Chancellor Johnson. “The students being recognized today made the choice to become leaders on their campuses, prioritize their studies, and serve their communities. Congratulations to this year’s awardees, and I applaud you for pursuing excellence in all that you do.”

The SUNY Adirondack recipients were Crystal Curry of Rockaway Beach and Jae Ran Grandy of South Korea.

Curry is a student trustee, a resident assistant and a Community Food Source worker. She is among the first Social Justice Scholars at SUNY Adirondack and is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and the recipient of the PTK All-USA Award. She has remained on both the Dean’s List and/or President’s List throughout her college career. She is a NASPA Certified Peer Educator and certified in Writing Composition and Tutoring Theory. 

Grandy graduated cum laude in January with an associate degree in applied science in Nursing. At her pinning ceremony, she received “The Five C’s of Nursing” Award, which represents compassion, competence, commitment, confidence and conscience. She is employed by Albany Medical Center.

SUNY Adirondack faculty and staff will be honored with Chancellor’s Awards at this year's graduation ceremony. Awardees include Excellence in Professional Service to Diane Wildey, Excellence in Teaching to Valerie Haskins, Excellence in Faculty Service to Dianne Schoder and Excellence in Classified Services to Deb Clevenger.

 

High School students share a new product idea with a panel of judges in the Pitch It completion during the 2018 High School Business Day.

High School students share a new product idea with a panel of judges in the Pitch It competition during the 2018 High School Business Day.

High school students compete for scholarships

SUNY Adirondack will hold the 26th annual High School Business Day on May 7 in the Northwest Bay Conference Center on the Queensbury campus.

The theme for this year’s event is “Game On,” and video game developer Chris Degnan will deliver the keynote address. 

Approximately 250 students from 11 area high schools — including Bolton, Brunswick, Corinth, Granville, Greenwich, Hudson Falls, Queensbury, Saratoga Springs, South Glens Falls, Ticonderoga and WSWHE BOCES — will compete in a variety of business-related tests and presentations. New additions to the program include competitions in Computer Applications/Business Formatting, General Business and Agricultural Business.

The event will incorporate programming for technology students, including a PC and Home Network Quiz Bowl and an Ethical Hacking Challenge.

First-place competition winners will receive $200 SUNY Adirondack scholarships, and students who place second- through fifth-place will receive Amazon gift cards.

SUNY Adirondack organized the event in a partnership with the Adirondack Business Educators.

 

Aja, a Brooklyn-based performer and rapper, headlined the annual ‘Slay ADK’ drag show.

Aja, a Brooklyn-based performer and rapper, headlined the annual ‘Slay ADK’ drag show.

Annual drag show benefits LGBTQ students

RuPaul’s Drag Race contestant Aja headlined SUNY Adirondack’s third annual “Slay ADK” drag show, which packed the SUNY Adirondack Theatre on April 26.

Aja, a Brooklyn-based performer and rapper, competed on the ninth season of RuPaul's Drag Race and RuPaul's Drag Race All Stars Season 3

“Slay ADK” also featured performances by Ms. Kitten Kaboodle, Kashi Golean, Opal Essence, Lady Adjacent, Oddity Spell, Jacqueline Frost, Philly Pina and Sandella, with music by DJ Drew Carey.

Performer Philly Pina won “Mx Slay ADK” for the second year in a row, receiving the greatest number of votes via text messaging.

The show topped last year’s fundraising, bringing in $2,938. The funds will be used to create a Pride Club Award, which will go to a continuing full-time student in good academic standing. Recipients must demonstrate a commitment to advocating for and promoting the needs of LGBTQ individuals on campus or in the community, and the fund will be distributed through the SUNY Adirondack Foundation.

SUNY Adirondack, Student Senate, College Activity Board, FSA of SUNY Adirondack and the HUB sponsored the event.

 

‘Sun’ by Cynthia Edman is one of many student pieces included in the Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition in the Visual Arts Gallery.

‘Sun’ by Cynthia Edman is one of many student pieces included in the Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition in the Visual Arts Gallery.

Student artists featured at Juried show

SUNY Adirondack’s Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition runs through May 9 in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall.

The show features recent work from SUNY Adirondack students and includes painting, drawing, photography, media arts, graphic design and 2-D and 3-D creations.

John Galt, professor of art at Skidmore College, served as juror for the exhibition. Galt, who also taught at the University Pennsylvania, earned a bachelor’s of arts in sculpture from SUNY Cortland and a master’s of fine arts in sculpture from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the owner of Ibis Casting, a company specializing in lost-wax ceramic shell fine art casting. He has designed and executed various types of sand molds at both Laran Bronze and Atlas Brass and Aluminum Company. Galt’s work in sculpture has been featured in exhibitions both regionally and nationally.

The Visual Arts Gallery is open to the public 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday.

 

‘Cinderella,’ a photo by Taylor Denton, is featured in the student show ‘through the viewfinder’  at the Student Center.

‘Cinderella,’ a photo by Taylor Denton, is featured in the student show ‘through the viewfinder’ at the Student Center.

‘Viewfinder’ highlights student photo work

SUNY Adirondack’s annual Intermediate Photography Exhibition runs through May 2 in the Student Center.

The show, titled “through the viewfinder,” is the final project for the college’s second-level photography class, which is part of the Media Arts program.

A meet-the-artists reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. May 2 in the Student Center. Light refreshments will be served, and the program is free and open to the public.

Featured photographers include Mariah Campbell, Autumn Collignon, Terrelle Cusson, Natalie DelCostello, Jenna Dennin, Taylor Denton, Alexis DeZalia, Matthew Gunther, Joseph Maxwell, Jermaine Owens, Christopher Payne, Daniel Prager, Frederick Stager, Michelle Stata and Rachael Yell.

 

Students, faculty and staff took a trip to London in the Spring as part of SUNY Adirondack’s International Education program.

Students, faculty and staff took a trip to London in the spring as part of SUNY Adirondack’s International Education program.

Travel with SUNY ADK

SUNY Adirondack has planned a variety of trips in Spring 2020 for students and community members seeking educational opportunities abroad.

In May 2020, “Scenic Scandinavia:  The Capitals, Castles and Fjords of Denmark and Norway” will bring students to the Scandinavian countries of Norway and Denmark, known for their fairytale beauty, rich history and ratings as the “Happiest Countries in the World” (2018 World Happiness Report). The group will explore 1,200-year-old Viking ships, Copenhagen and Oslo (the capitals of Denmark and Norway), royal palaces, museums, colorful harbors and the medieval town of Bergen. Travel includes a ride on the world-renowned Flaamsbana scenic train and ferry rides through the most majestic fjords in the world. 

For more information, contact Carol Hopper at hopperc@sunyacc.edu or Kevin Ankeny at ankenyk@sunyacc.edu.

SUNY Adirondack will travel to Japan in May 2020 and be welcomed by both Nishikyushu University and Saga Women’s Junior College. Students travel as a group during the day, experiencing Japanese culture, history and entertainment. During the evenings and weekends, students are welcomed into their host family’s home to experience Japan firsthand. Past students have formed lasting friendships with the students and host families they met while in Japan. Highlights include an overnight to either Tokyo or Osaka; visits to architectural, religious, historical and cultural sites and events; and interaction with Japanese college students.

For more information, contact Carrie Menard at menardc@sunyacc.edu or at John Hampshire at hampshirej@sunyacc.edu

The college also plans a medical mission to Rumundo, Guatemala. Travel details are still being established. For more information, contact Mary McDermott at mcdermottm@sunyacc.edu or Dana Abbey at abbeyd@sunyacc.edu.

Prospective travelers should begin planning for 2020-2021 international trips to Ireland in March and Columbia in May.

More information on International Education offerings is available online.

 

A middle school student gets hands-on experience in a science lab during the 2018 Girls Go Stem event on the SUNY Adirondack campus.

A middle school student gets hands-on experience in a science lab during the 2018 Girls Go Stem event on the SUNY Adirondack campus.

Campus event to encourage STEM education for girls

The Adirondack Branch of the American Association of University Women and the SUNY Adirondack Office of Continuing Education will present Girls Go STEM, a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) program for 100 middle school girls, on May 14 on the SUNY Adirondack campus in Queensbury.

Girls Go STEM will feature hands-on workshops in a variety of STEM-related disciplines to give girls an opportunity to engage, learn, explore and meet accomplished women in a collegiate setting.

According to the National Girls Collaborative Project, women fill less than 30 percent of the country’s STEM-related jobs, even though women make up half of the workforce.

Female academics and professionals from SUNY Adirondack, Salem Central School District, SI Group, Hudson Falls Central School, Drs. Kline and Boyd Optometrists, Weather Routing and The Chazen Companies will present workshops to students.  Arlette St. Romain, Principal and Director of Environmental Due Diligence and Brownfields Investigations at The Chazen Companies, will deliver the keynote address.

 

A prospective student from the New York City area interacts with Eddy Rondack during an April bus trip organized by SUNY Adirondack’s Admissions Office.

A prospective student from the New York City area interacts with Eddy Rondack during an April bus trip organized by SUNY Adirondack’s Admissions Office.

Campus visitations on the rise

SUNY Adirondack's Admissions Office has brought a record number of students to the college during the spring, both for campus tours and special events.

The Discover SUNY Adirondack Bus Trip in April gave accepted applicants from the New York City area an opportunity to visit campus for the day to learn more about their intended major and programs and services offered at the college. Students Ambassadors led tours of the campus and Residence Hall.    

The Admissions Office organized the annual Open House on April 12 in the Northwest Bay Conference Center. It was the largest Open House on record, with more than 600 people in attendance. SUNY Adirondack faculty and staff engaged visitors with hands-on demonstrations and interactive presentations throughout the morning.

 

Adventure Sports students were out hiking well before the last snow melted.

Adventure Sports students were out hiking well before the last snow melted.

Spring in New York is an adventure

Although spring felt like it got a late arrival for most people in the region, Adventure Sports students didn’t let the cold weather get in the way.

"With the snow melting away, we prepped for our Wilderness First Responder practicum as well as the AVS 102 and AVS 101 expeditions,” said Mike DeFilippo, special adjunct in Adventure Sports. “The climbing season is in full bloom as well. It is a great time to get outside.”

 

College increases opportunities for adult learners

Recognizing that many students come to college with considerable knowledge, skills and abilities, SUNY Adirondack is updating its inventory of opportunities for students to have their prior learning assessed for credit equivalency.

Under the leadership of Diane Wildey, Dean for Academic Initiatives, and the Divisional Affairs Committee, faculty members in each of the college’s academic divisions are updating a college-wide system for awarding college credit for students who have certifications, prior work experience, military training or other prior learning.

Many of the college’s academic divisions now recognize College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST), Excelsior College equivalents and/or certain industry credentials as evidence that student learning outcome have been achieved.

Read more information about opportunities for adult learners on the SUNY Adirondack website.

 


THINGS TO DO

SUNY Adirondack has a new clocktower on campus, thanks to a donation from the Adirondack Regional Chamber of Commerce.

SUNY Adirondack has a new clock tower on campus, thanks to a donation from the Adirondack Regional Chamber of Commerce.

  • SUNY Adirondack and the Adirondack Regional Chamber of Commerce will hold a dedication ceremony for the college’s new clock tower at noon May 1 at the new clock near Bryan Hall on the north side of campus. A reception will follow inside the Northwest Bay Conference Center in Adirondack Hall.
  • And end-of-the-year celebration featuring the launch of Expressions literary magazine and readings by writing majors will be held at 12:30 p.m. May 1 in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall. The program is free and open to the public. The magazine will be distributed during the event.
  • The college will hold its 52nd annual Academic Awards Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. May 3 in the Theatre on the Queensbury campus. A reception will precede the ceremony. The event is free and open to the public.
  • The SUNY Adirondack Student Senate will hold its annual Festival of Hope fundraiser, a benefit for the Tri-County United Way, starting at 2 p.m. May 4 on the college campus. The event, which is open to the public, will include games, food, prizes and inflatables. An Adirondack Spring Opener car show, formerly known as the ADK Peak Shifters, has been incorporated into the programming. All activities will be held in the south parking lot and athletic field.
  • The college will hold a dedication ceremony for a “Tree of Life” plaque in memoriam to Mary LaPann at 12:30 p.m. May 6 in the vestibule area of the main floor of Eisenhart Hall on the Queensbury campus. 
  • The college’s annual Employee Recognition Program will be held at 3 p.m. May 7 in Scoville Auditorium. Refreshments will follow in the library.
  • SUNY Adirondack’s Commencement ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. May 11 at the Cool Insuring Arena (formerly known as the Glens Falls Civic Center). The event is free and open to the public.
  • SUNY Adirondack faculty and staff are encouraged to attend the college’s annual Community Day from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 17 in the Northwest Bay Conference Center. The program will include presentations about the Middle States Commission on Higher Education accreditation process, a showcase of new technology on campus and interactive professional development workshops to advance the college's Equity Agenda.
  • SUNY Adirondack’s annual Intermediate Photography Exhibition, titled “through the viewfinder,” runs through May 2 in the Student Center. A meet-the-artists reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. May 2 in the Student Center. Light refreshments will be served, and the program is free and open to the public.
  • SUNY Adirondack’s Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition runs through May 9 in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall. The Visual Arts Gallery is open to the public 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday.

ACCOLADES

Staff from the Registrar’s Office, Upward Bound and Facilities recently received honors for their 4DX work.

  • As part of the college’s 4DX project, several campus departments received recognition in April for their efforts to increase student retention. The Registrar’s Office received Silver and Gold honors and Upward Bound and Facilities received Bronze certificates. Facilities chose to increase the number of work orders submitted by support staff in the spring semester from 458 to 600 by June 1 as its WIG. (The number 458 was the amount of work orders submitted by support staff in the fall semester.) By increasing the number to 600, the Facilities staff was encouraged to be more proactive in finding items to address. The Facilities team thought by increasing work orders it would in turn allow the faculty to spend more time with the students and less time having to go through the trouble of submitting work orders. The 4DX project inspired the staff to take initiative and ownership in addressing the overall wellness of this campus.
  • This year’s SUNY Adirondack President’s Awards recognize the commitment of Jessica Best for Teaching Junior Faculty, Di Kivi for Teaching Adjunct Faculty, Kelsey Lorusso for Administrative Service and Jody Clothier for Support and Confidential Staff.
  • The Conkling Center of Glens Falls recently appointed Jill Vogel to its Board of Directors. The Conkling Center’s mission is to promote and support the quality of life for all senior persons in the community.
  • Renee O’Brien, professor of Photography, has a digital zone-plate photograph, “Zac, 2018,” in the Expression 2019 Juried Art Show at the Shirt Factory Gallery in Glens Falls. Jonathan Canning, director of curatorial affairs and programming at The Hyde Collection, served as juror for the exhibition, which runs through May 25. A reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. May 4.

TIMBERWOLF TRACKS

Michael and Melinda White present a check to SUNY Adirondack golf coach Michael Carpenter to honor the memory of their son, Riley Olson.

Michael and Melinda White present a check to SUNY Adirondack golf coach Michael Carpenter to honor the memory of their son, Riley Olson.

Riley Olson Foundation supports SUNY Adirondack golf team

The Riley Olson Foundation recently donated $1,000 to the SUNY Adirondack golf team.

Olson, a member of the SUNY Adirondack golf team, passed away from a skiing accident in 2016. His family created the Riley Olson Foundation to honor his legacy and support local causes.

“Riley had a tremendous passion for golf his entire life,” said Michael White, who started the Riley Olson Foundation to honor his late son. “He was so excited that he was eligible to play golf for the college, and he stated how happy he was and how much he appreciated coach Michael Carpenter for giving him the chance to compete for SUNY Adirondack.”

Carpenter views the gift as a fitting legacy to Olson.

“As coach of the Varsity Golf Team, it was my pleasure to have known Riley as a person, as a student and as an athlete. Both the varsity golf team and the college greatly appreciate the support that we receive from the Riley Olson Foundation,” Carpenter said.

The gift will be used to enhance the experiences of current and future players by purchasing additional equipment for the team and by extending the playing season by being able to travel to additional tournaments, according to Carpenter.

Through the Riley Olson Foundation, Olson’s parents, Michael and Melinda White, also established two awards for nursing students at SUNY Adirondack in recognition of the compassionate and wonderful care he received following his accident.  

“Riley was taken to University of Vermont Medical Center at the time of this accident.  We experienced unbelievable love and professionalism from the entire staff, but the nurses truly touched our heart,” White said. “Near the end of our stay, we wanted something good to come out of this tragedy that our family experienced. We immediately wanted to do something meaningful for the nursing profession.”

The Riley Olson Foundation holds the annual Riley Olson Golf Tournament, which is planned for July 14 at Hiland Park Country Club in Queensbury. Online registration is available at https://birdeasepro.com/event/register/9176/.


FOUNDATION

The SUNY Adirondack Foundation held a special ADay4ADK fundraiser, using this logo.

Thank you

The SUNY Adirondack Foundation thanks everyone who participated in ADay4ADK, its one-day fundraiser on April 10. Through generous gifts, the event surpassed its goal and raised a total of $3,500 for the SUNY Adirondack Foundation.

 

Alumni, faculty and community members are encouraged to compete in the 30th anniversary of the Lyman A. Beeman Jr. Annual Golf Tournament on May 31.

Get into the swing of spring

The SUNY Adirondack Foundation invites you to participate in the 30th anniversary of the Lyman A. Beeman Jr. Annual Golf Tournament on May 31.

Through the years, the tournament has raised more than $350,000 to benefit the SUNY Adirondack Foundation scholarship program.

The golf outing at Hiland Park Country Club includes a barbecue lunch, cocktail reception and awards ceremony. Prizes are awarded for low gross, the top three low net scores, the women’s team with the lowest net score, longest drive and closest to the pin.

The entry fee is $160 per player or $640 for a foursome. 

Registration and lunch begin at 11:30 a.m., with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. The format is a four-person scramble. To register, visit sunyacc.edu/beemangolf.


HUMAN RESOURCES

Job Listings

SUNY Adirondack is currently seeking applicants for the following positions:

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