Title IX

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response at SUNY Adirondack

Title IX Coordinator: Mindy Wilson
Phone: 518.743.2252
Email: wilsonm@sunyacc.edu
Office: Human Resources, Warren Hall

Deputy Title IX Coordinator: Matthew McKay
Personal Gender Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Phone: 518.681.5604
Email: mckaym@sunyacc.edu
Office: Student Center 201

Wilton Center Contact: Jenna St-Jacques
Phone: 518.584.3959
Email: stjacquesj@sunyacc.edu
Office: Wilton Center 105B

If you have observed or experienced any kind of sex discrimination (including sexual harassment or sexual violence), please contact Title IX Coordinator Mindy Wilson. She can explain your options for reporting and connect you to the right services and resources, as well as help you access on-campus accommodations. These options for support are all available to you whether or not you choose to engage in the Campus Conduct Process or report to law enforcement. You can review the College's Reporting Policies in full HERE or below in the Options for Confidentially Disclosing Sexual Violence section.

What is Title IX?

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence, in any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. The protections and sanctions of Title IX extend to the students and employees of SUNY Adirondack, as well as third parties to the campus.

Any observed or experienced incidents should be reported as soon as practicable to the Title IX Coordinator, and anyone who receives a report should reach out to the Title IX Coordinator as soon as practicable for assistance.

SUNY Adirondack affirms its policy to provide equal opportunity in employment and education through its commitment to creating a safe, fair and respectful environment for all students, employees and visitors. Sex discrimination in any form, including sexual harassment and sexual violence, is against the law and is a violation of SUNY Adirondack’s non-discrimination policy. Sexual discrimination in the form of sexual harassment is prohibited by Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. It is also a violation of New York State’s Human Rights Law.

We are aware of the sensitivity of situations involving sexual harassment and sexual violence and urge those who have observed or experienced any incident to seek support and assistance as soon as possible. A written complaint or formal grievance need not be made in order to seek advice or utilize resources. SUNY Adirondack offers the following to assist students and employees in understanding the options and support services available to them:

SUNY Adirondack Title IX Coordinator

  • The Title IX Coordinator will make sure you understand all of your rights and options for moving forward, as well as all of the resources available to you.
  • The Title IX Coordinator will work closely with Public Safety, the Dean for Student Affairs, and the Director of Human Resources in the filing and adjudication of complaints through our campus processes.

On- and Off-Campus Authorities

  • Anyone wishing to file a criminal complaint can contact Campus Public Safety, local or state police, and/or the Campus Sexual Assault Victims Unit.
  • The Title IX Coordinator can help connect you to any of these resources.

Confidential and Private Resources 

  • Your privacy will be respected and protected to the greatest extent practicable at all times, though strict confidentiality can only be guaranteed by licensed health professionals, off-campus victim advocates (such as employees at a Rape Crisis Center), and clergy.
  • SUNY Adirondack’s Counseling Center offers both private and confidential counseling services at no cost to students.
  • You can also access outside confidential support services, including hotlines and victim advocacy organizations.

The Title IX Coordinator, in conjunction with Student Affairs, Student Life, Counseling, and Human Resources, will provide training and educational programming throughout the year and as requested. Information and resources are always available from the Title IX Coordinator. 

Options for Confidentially Disclosing Sexual Violence

The State University of New York and SUNY Adirondack want you to have information and to get the support you need regardless of whether you want to move forward with a report of sexual violence to College officials or to police. You might want to talk with someone about something you observed or experienced, even if you aren’t sure it constitutes sexual violence. A conversation where questions can be answered is far better than keeping something to yourself. Confidentiality varies, and the information below is aimed at helping you understand how confidentiality applies to the different resources that are available to you.

SUNY has created a thorough list of resources available in New York State. Visit the SUNY Sexual Assault & Violence Response (SAVR) Resources to search by proximity to campus or by geographic region.

Updated: November 17, 2016

Individuals who are confidential resources will not report crimes to law enforcement or college officials without your permission, except for extreme circumstances such as a health or safety emergency. Please note that even individuals who can typically maintain confidentiality are subject to exceptions under the law, including the mandatory reporting of child abuse.

SUNY Adirondack Confidential Resources:

  • Holly Irion, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518.681.5620; irionh@sunyacc.edu; Residence Hall 161
  • Beth Braxton, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518.743.2249; braxtone@sunyacc.edu; Warren Hall 147

 

Off-campus Counselors and Advocates:

  • Planned Parenthood 24-Hour Rape Crisis Hotline: 866.307.4086
  • Domestic Violence Project 24-Hour Hotline: 518.793.9496
  • Saratoga County Wellspring Victim Services 24-Hour Hotline: 518.584.8188

Note that these outside services do not provide any information to SUNY Adirondack. They will generally maintain confidentiality unless you request disclosure and sign a consent or waiver form. More information on an agency’s policies on confidentiality may be obtained directly from the agency.

Off-campus Healthcare Providers:

  • Glens Falls Hospital SANE Program in the Emergency Department: 518.926.3000; 100 Park Street; Glens Falls, NY 12801
  • Saratoga Hospital SANE Program in the Emergency Department: 518.583.8313; 211 Church Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
  • List of New York State SANE Services by County
  • Planned Parenthood Mohawk Hudson, Glens Falls Center: 518.792.0994; 135 Warren St. Glens Falls, NY 12801
  • Warren County Public Health: 518.761.6580; Warren County Municipal Center, 1340 State Route 9, Lake George, NY 12845
  • Washington County Public Health: 518.746.2400; Washington County Annex Building, 415 Lower Main Street, Hudson Falls, NY 12839
  • Saratoga County Public Health: 518.584.7460, ext. 8365; Saratoga Community Health Center, 24 Hamilton Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
    • You MUST be a Saratoga County resident to utilize this clinic. Otherwise, please contact Warren or Washington County Public Health Services who will assist any SUNY Adirondack student regardless of county of residence.

Note that medical office and insurance billing practices may reveal information to the insurance policyholder, including medication and/or examinations paid for or administered.

  • In the event that you choose to have a sexual assault forensic exam, we strongly encourage calling the Planned Parenthood Victim Advocacy Services 24-Hour Hotline (866.307.4086) or the Saratoga County Wellspring Victim Services 24-Hour Hotline (518.584.8188). One of their trained staff members can attend the exam with you as your advocate, offer support, and advise you through the process, including making sure your health insurance is not billed.
  • If you do not utilize advocacy services, you are encouraged to let hospital personnel know if you do not what your insurance policyholder to be notified about your access to these services.
  • The New York State Office of Victim Services (OVS) may be able to assist in compensating victims/survivors for healthcare and counseling services, including emergency compensation. More information may be found on OVS’s webpage for the Forensic Rape Examination (FRE) Direct Reimbursement Program, or by calling OVS at 800.247.8035.
    • A list of additional services offered by OVS can be found here.

Non-Professional counselors (those who are not licensed mental health counselors) and advocates can also assist you without sharing information that could identify you. At SUNY Adirondack, this includes our Counseling Center (Warren Hall 117; 518-743-2278 or frenchm@sunyacc.edu to schedule an appointment). Our counselors who are not licensed mental health counselors will report the nature, date, time and general location of an incident to the Title IX Coordinator, but will consult with you to ensure no personally identifying details are shared without your consent; these individuals are not considered confidential resources as discussed above.

Even SUNY Adirondack offices and employees that cannot guarantee confidentiality will maintain your privacy to the greatest extent possible. The information you provide to a non-confidential resource will be relayed only as necessary to investigate and/or seek a resolution and to notify the Title IX Coordinator or designee, who are responsible for tracking patterns and spotting systemic issues. SUNY Adirondack will limit the disclosure as much as possible, even if the Title IX Coordinator determines that a request for confidentiality cannot be honored. For information on how SUNY Adirondack weighs a request for confidentiality, see below.

 

If you disclose an incident to a SUNY Adirondack employee who is responsible for responding to or reporting sexual violence or sexual harassment, but wish to maintain confidentiality or do not consent to SUNY Adirondack’s request to initiate an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator must weigh your request against our obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all members of our community, including you.

We will assist you with academic, housing, transportation, employment, and other reasonable and available accommodations regardless of your reporting choices. While reporting individuals may request accommodations through several college offices, the Title IX Coordinator can serve as a primary point of contact to assist with these measures (Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316). We also may take proactive steps, such as training or awareness efforts, to combat sexual violence in a general way that does not identify you nor the situation you disclosed.

We may seek consent from you prior to conducting an investigation. You may decline to consent to an investigation, and that determination will be honored unless the College’s failure to act does not adequately mitigate the risk of harm to you or other members of the SUNY Adirondack community. Honoring your request for confidentiality may limit our ability to meaningfully investigate and pursue conduct action against an accused individual.

When you disclose an incident to someone who is responsible for responding to and/or reporting sexual violence or sexual harassment but wish to maintain confidentiality, SUNY Adirondack will consider many factors to determine whether we must proceed despite your request. These factors include, but are not limited to:

  • Whether the accused has a history of violent behavior or is a repeat offender;
  • Whether the incident represents escalation, such as a situation that previously involved sustained stalking;
  • The increased risk that the accused will commit additional acts of violence;
  • Whether the accused used a weapon or force;
  • Whether the reporting individual is a minor;
  • Whether we possess other means to obtain evidence such as security footage; and
  • Whether the report reveals a pattern of perpetration at a given location or by a particular group.

If the College determines that we must move forward with an investigation despite the request for confidentiality, the reporting individual or victim/survivor will be notified and the College will take immediate action as necessary to protect and assist them.

 

If you disclose a situation through a public awareness event such as “Take Back the Night,” candlelight vigils, protests, or other public event, SUNY Adirondack is not obligated to begin an investigation. The College may use the information you provide to inform the need for additional education and prevention efforts.

 

If a reporting individual wishes to keep his/her identity anonymous, he or she may call Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay anonymously to discuss the situation and available options (518.743.2319).

Reporting individuals may also call the New Your State Hotline for Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence (800.942.6906). The Hotline is for crisis intervention, resources, and referrals and is not a reporting mechanism.

 

Reports of certain crimes occurring in certain geographic locations will be included in the SUNY Adirondack Clery Act Annual Security Report in an anonymized manner that neither identifies the specifics of the crime nor the identity of the reporting individual or victim/survivor. Questions about recording crimes in the Annual Security Report can be directed to:

  • Tressie LaFay, Title IX Coordinator: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316.
  • Anthony Palangi, Director of Facilities and Public Safety: 518.743.2240; palangia@sunyacc.edu; Warren Hall 007

SUNY Adirondack is obligated to issue timely warnings of Clery Act crimes occurring within relevant geography that represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees. (This is subject to exception when the warning could potentially compromise law enforcement efforts and/or when the warning itself could potentially identify the reporting individual or victim/survivor.) A reporting individual will never be identified in a timely warning.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) allows the College the option to share information with parents when (1) There is a health or safety emergency, or (2) The student is a dependent on either parents’ prior year federal income tax return. Generally, SUNY Adirondack will not share information about a report of sexual violence with parents without the permission of the reporting individual.

 

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Policies

SUNY Adirondack is committed to creating and maintaining an educational environment free from all forms of sex discrimination, including sexual misconduct. Specifically, SUNY Adirondack strictly prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking and all forms of sex discrimination. These acts violate a person’s feelings of trust and safety and can also substantially interfere with a student’s education. It is the policy of SUNY Adirondack that, upon learning that an act of sexual misconduct has taken place, immediate action will be taken to address the situation.

SUNY Adirondack encourages the reporting of sexual misconduct that is prompt and accurate. This allows the college community to quickly respond to allegations and offer immediate support of the victim. SUNY Adirondack is committed to protecting the privacy of victims and will work closely with students who wish to obtain confidential assistance regarding an incident of sexual misconduct. Certain professionals at the College are permitted by law to offer total confidentiality; those who do not maintain this privilege will nonetheless protect a student’s privacy to the fullest extent possible. All allegations will be investigated promptly and thoroughly, and both the victim and the accused will be afforded equitable rights during the investigative process. 

It is the collective responsibility of all members of the SUNY Adirondack community to foster a safe and secure campus environment. In an effort to promote this environment and prevent acts of sexual misconduct from occurring, the college engages in ongoing prevention and awareness education programs. All incoming students and employees are required to participate in these programs, and all members of the college community are encouraged to participate throughout the year in ongoing campaigns and trainings focused on the prevention of sexual misconduct on campus.

Scope

Who: This policy applies to all members of the SUNY Adirondack community, including students, faculty, staff, visitors, independent contractors, and other third parties who are on campus and involved in an incident of sexual misconduct (i.e. someone who witnessed an incident or who wishes to report an incident on behalf of another). The policy applies to these parties regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. 

What: This policy prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct. This broad term includes but is not limited to acts of sexual harassment, sexual violence, sexual coercion, sexual threats or intimidation, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and cyber-stalking. Please refer to the Annual Security Report for definitions of these specific crimes. 

Where: This policy covers conduct taking place on the college campus. This includes an building or property owned or controlled by SUNY Adirondack and used in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the school’s educational purposes, including residence halls, dining halls and public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from campus. This also includes any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the college and any building or property not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the college that supports or relates to the school’s educational purposes and is frequently used by students. This policy also covers conduct that takes place off campus that may have a nexus to the college community.

Programs and Activities: This policy covers all educational, extracurricular, and athletic or other campus programs, as well as all campus and school-related activities, including but not limited to student organizations, community organizations with student and/or employee participation, and all other educational or extracurricular events hosted by the college.

Relationships: This policy covers sexual misconduct occurring between individuals in various types of relationships. Sexual misconduct may be acts committed by an individual or collective actions committed by members of a group or organization. These acts may be committed against an individual or against a group or organization. These acts may be committed by a stranger, acquaintance, or by someone with whom the victim has a social, romantic or intimate relationship. These acts may be committed by or against any individual regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

Academic Accommodations: The College is committed to ensuring the safety and well-being of the victim. A student who has been a victim of sexual misconduct may request an academic accommodation or change in residence after a report of sexual misconduct. Any individual who makes a request will receive appropriate and reasonable accommodation. Possible requests include the ability to change academic or work schedules, withdraw from or retake a class without penalty, access academic support such as tutoring services, and change residence hall assignments. Pursuant to Title IX, in most cases of sexual violence or sex discrimination, the College will endeavor to the extent practicable to change the schedule or accommodations of the accused student prior to changing the accommodations of the victim.

Interim Measures: In situations where it is necessary, the College will take immediate steps to protect victims pending the final outcome of an investigation. These steps include the accommodations listed above in addition to the issuing of no-contact orders. Pending resolution of the complaint, the accused may be prohibited from contacting the victim and may be placed on temporary suspension or denied access to the campus. The College may change the course schedule or residence assignment of the accused. Please refer to the Code of Conduct for disciplinary procedures related to acts of sexual misconduct.  

Confidentiality:  The College is committed to maintaining the privacy of all individuals involved in a report of sexual misconduct. While the College encourages victims to report an incident of sexual misconduct to College officials, there are many options available for students to speak with someone about what happened while maintaining confidentiality. Please see the SUNY Adirondack webpage on Options for Confidentially Disclosing Sexual Violence for more information on confidentiality.

Burden of Proof: The burden of proof in all cases is “preponderance of the evidence,” whether it is “more likely than not” that the sex discrimination, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking occurred. If the evidence presented meets this standard, then the respondent must be found responsible.

Updated: November 17, 2016

The health and safety of every student at the State University of New York and its state-operated and community colleges is of utmost importance. SUNY Adirondack recognizes that students who have been drinking and/or using drugs (whether such use is voluntary or involuntary) at the time that an incident of sexual or interpersonal violence occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential consequences related to their own conduct.

SUNY Adirondack strongly encourages students to report any incidents of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault to a college official. A bystander or reporting individual that, in good faith, discloses any incident of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault to a SUNY Adirondack official or local law enforcement will not be subject to Code of Conduct action for violations relating to the use of alcohol and/or illegal drugs at or near the time the violence was committed.

This amnesty:

  • Specifically covers Code of Conduct action of a disciplinary nature. It does not prevent SUNY Adirondack from seeking help for a student who is struggling with excessive alcohol or drug use or addiction, or who is otherwise in danger.
  • Is unrelated to off-campus adjudication, such as criminal prosecution or arrest by outside law enforcement.
  • Is available for alcohol and/or illegal drug use by individuals. Dealers and distributors are not shielded from adjudication, nor are those who drug others without their knowledge.
  • Does not specifically limit the actions of external laws, policies or accreditation requirements that require removal or restrictions for those using alcohol or drugs from a clinical or similar setting.

Updated: November 17, 2016

The State University of New York and SUNY Adirondack are committed to providing options, support and assistance to victims/survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and/or stalking to ensure that they can continue to participate in campus programs and activities.  All victims/survivors of these crimes and violations—regardless of the victim/survivor’s race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, sex, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, military status, domestic violence victim status, or criminal conviction—have the following rights, which apply whether the crime or violation occurs on campus, off campus, or while studying abroad.

All students have the right to:

  1. Make a report to law enforcement and/or state police;
  2. Have disclosures of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual assault treated seriously;
  3. Make a decision about whether or not to disclose a crime or violation and participate in the campus conduct process and/or the criminal justice process free from pressure from the College;
  4. Participate in a process that is fair, impartial and provides adequate notice and a meaningful opportunity to be heard;
  5. Be treated with dignity, and to receive from the College courteous, fair, and respectful counseling services as well as assistance in accessing off-campus medical resources. (See Resources for Support below).
  6. Be free from any suggestion that the reporting individual is at fault when these crimes and violations are committed, or should have acted in a different manner to avoid such crimes or violations;
  7. Describe the incident to as few College officials as practicable, and not to be required to unnecessarily repeat a description of the incident;
  8. Be protected from retaliation by the College, any student, the accused and/or the respondent, and/or their friends, family and acquaintances within the jurisdiction of the College; 
  9. Access at least one level of appeal of a determination;
  10. Be accompanied by an advisor of choice who may assist and advise a reporting individual, accused, or respondent throughout the conduct process, including all meetings and hearings related to such process;
  11. Exercise civil rights and practice of religion without interference by the investigative, criminal justice, or conduct process of the College.

Options in Brief

Students have many options that can be pursued at the same time, including: 

  • Receiving resources, such as counseling and medical attention;
  • Confidentially or anonymously disclosing a crime or violation;
  • Reporting an incident to a SUNY Adirondack official, including the Title IX Coordinator, the Dean for Student Affairs, the Director of Human Resources or Campus Public Safety;
  • Reporting an incident to local law enforcement, state police, and/or the Campus Sexual Victims Assault Unit.

For more information on confidentially disclosing an incident, click HERE or see Options for Confidentially Disclosing Sexual Violence above. SUNY Adirondack’s full Sexual Violence Response Policy including resources is available below.

Download the Students' Bill of Rights.

 Updated: November 17, 2016

Climate assessments afford institutions the opportunity to better understand their campus and to make informed decisions when it comes to providing a safe educational environment. Beginning in the 2016-2017 academic year, each State University of New York state-operated and community college will conduct a uniform climate survey that ascertains student experience with and knowledge of reporting and college adjudicatory processes for sexual harassment (including sexual violence) and other related crimes

The survey will address at least the following:

  • Student and employee knowledge about:
    • The Title IX Coordinator’s role;
    • Campus policies and procedures addressing sexual assault;
    • How and where to report sexual violence as a victim/survivor or witness;
    • Availability of resources on and off campus, such as counseling, healthcare and academic assistance;
    • The prevalence of victimization and perpetration of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking on and off campus during a set time period (for example, the last two years);
    • Bystander attitudes and behavior;
    • Whether victims/survivors reported to SUNY Adirondack and/or police, and reasons why they did or did not report;
    • The general awareness of the difference, if any, between the institution’s policies and the penal law; and
    • The general awareness of the definition of affirmative consent.

SUNY Adirondack will take all necessary steps to ensure that answers remain anonymous and that no individual is identified. Results will be published on the campus website providing no personally identifiable information shall be shared.

This policy may be changed by the SUNY Chancellor or designee should federal and/or state legislation require a different process or duplicate efforts to assess campus climate via survey.

More information on SUNY Adirondack’s participation in the SUNY Campus Climate Assessment will be posted on this page as it becomes available. Should you have any questions or comments in the meantime, please contact Title IX Coordinator, Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319 or lafayt@sunyacc.edu.

Updated: November 17, 2016

 

Affirmative Consent is a knowing, voluntary, and mutual decision among all participants to engage in sexual activity. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission regarding willingness to engage in the sexual activity. Silence or lack of resistance, in and of itself, does not demonstrate consent. The definition of consent does not vary based upon a participant’s sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

  • Consent is active, not passive. Consent to any sexual act or prior consensual sexual activity between or with any party does not necessarily establish consent for any other sexual acts. 
  • Consent is the responsibility of the person(s) initiating, and it's required regardless of whether the person(s) initiating sexual activity has been using drugs and/or alcohol. A student who is charged with sexual activity without consent cannot use the fact that they themselves were under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol at the time of the incident as a defense to the violation.
  • Consent can be given through words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission and willingness to engage in sexual activity; silence itself does not equal consent. Moreover, it is not a defense to sexual activity without consent to say that a reporting individual failed to say no or actively resist.  
  • Consent can be withdrawn at any time, even when it has been initially given. When consent is withdrawn, or if it can no longer be given, sexual activity must stop.
  • Consent is not coerced. It cannot be given as a result of coercion, intimidation, force, or the threat of harm. 
  • Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, meaning they lack the ability to knowingly choose to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitation may be caused by:
    • Lack of consciousness or being asleep;
    • Being involuntarily restrained;
    • Use of alcohol, drugs or other intoxicants, depending on the degree of intoxication;
    • If any of the parties are under the age of 17; and/or
    • If an individual otherwise cannot consent.

For a great visual about Affirmative Consent, see SUNY Oneonta's Do you need to know the definition of consent? Much of the language used above was borrowed directly from SUNY Oneonta. 

Updated: November 17, 2016

The State University of New York and its state-operated and community colleges believe that sexual violence prevention training and education cannot be accomplished via a single day or single method of training. To that end, SUNY Adirondack will continue to educate all new and current students using a variety of best practices aimed at educating the entire college community in a way that decreases violence and maintains a culture where sexual assault and acts of violence are not tolerated.

All new first-year and transfer students will receive training on the following:

  • SUNY Adirondack prohibits sexual harassment, including: sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or other violence or threats of violence, and will offer resources to any victims/survivors of such violence while taking administrative and conduct action regarding any accused individual within the jurisdiction of the institution;
  • Relevant definitions, including but not limited to the definitions of sexual violence and consent;
  • That policies apply equally to all students regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression;
  • The role of the Title IX Coordinator, Campus Public Safety, and other relevant offices that address violence prevention and response;
  • Awareness of violence, its impact on victims/survivors and their friends and family, and its long term impact;
  • The Students’ Bill of Rights and the Sexual Violence Response Policy, including:
    • How to report sexual violence and other crimes confidentially, and/or to SUNY Adirondack officials, Campus Public Safety, and local law enforcement; and
    • How to obtain services and support;
  • Bystander intervention and the importance of taking action, when one can safely do so, to prevent violence;
  • The protections of the Policy on Alcohol and/or Drug Use Amnesty in Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Cases;
  • Risk assessment and reduction, including but not limited to steps that potential victims/survivors and potential assailants and bystanders to violence can take to lower the incidence of sexual violence; and
  • Consequences and sanctions for individuals who commit these crimes. 

Beginning in the 2015-2016 academic year, SUNY Adirondack and all SUNY state-operated and community colleges will require that student leaders and officers of registered/recognized student organizations, as well as those seeking recognition, complete training on domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking prevention as part of the approval process. Additionally, SUNY Adirondack will require student-athletes to complete training in domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking prior to participating in intercollegiate athletics.

For information about upcoming educational opportunities and events regarding sexual violence prevention and awareness, please visit the Student Activties homepage.

Updated: November 17, 2016

If you or someone you know has been the victim of sexual violence, please know there are a number of on- and off-campus resources to help you. See below, and remember you can contact the Title IX Coordinator at any time with questions or to ask for help.

Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; or Scoville Learning Center Suite 316

Resources for Immediate Support

Below you will find contact information for trained individuals on- and off-campus who can provide immediate help in a crisis situation, including Campus Public Safety, local law enforcement, and local healthcare providers.
 

Safety Resources for Emergency Situations

Confidential Resources

  • On-Campus: You can confidentially disclose an incident to either of our counselors who, by law, maintain confidentiality. They can also help you in obtaining additional services on- and off-campus.
    • Holly Irion, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518.681.5620; irionh@sunyacc.edu; Residence Hall 161
    • Beth Braxton, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518.743.2249; braxtone@sunyacc.edu; Warren Hall 147
       
  • Off-Campus: You can confidentially disclose an incident to an advocate and receive help from any of the following community, county or state resources.
    • Local to SUNY Adirondack:
      • Planned Parenthood 24-Hour Rape Crisis Hotline: 866.307.4086
      • Domestic Violence Project 24-Hour Hotline: 518.793.9496
      • Saratoga County Wellspring Victim Services 24-Hour Hotline: 518.584.8188
    • New York State:
    • NOTE: Hotlines are for crisis intervention, resources and referrals, and their staff members are well-trained to help victims of sexual violence. However, they are services distinct from the College, meaning that hotlines do not provide SUNY Adirondack with any information. We strongly encourage you to additionally contact a campus resource so we are aware of your situation and can provide you with additional support and resources.
Campus Resources

These are private—not confidential—resources; they will nevertheless protect your privacy to the very best of their ability. They may still be required by law and college policy to inform certain college officials, like the Title IX Coordinator, about an incident.

  • Counseling Center: 518.743.2278, Student Services Wing of Warren Hall
    • Seeing a SUNY Adirondack counselor is always free of charge to students. Additionally, our counselors can help you make arrangements to see an off-campus counselor free of charge for up to eight (8) sessions and on a sliding payment scale thereafter.
  • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316
  • Campus Public Safety: 518.743.7233; Residence Hall 164-166
 
Medical Resources
  • Within 96 hours of an assault, you can get a Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (commonly referred to as a "rape kit") at a hospital. To best preserve evidence, you should avoid showering, washing, changing your clothes, combing your hair, drinking, eating, or doing anything to alter your appearance before you have the physical exam.
    • Glens Falls Hospital and Saratoga Hospital offer these exams by specially trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE).
      • Glens Falls Hospital SANE Program in the Emergency Department: 518.926.3000; 100 Park Street; Glens Falls, NY 12801
      • Saratoga Hospital SANE Program in the Emergency Department: 518.583.8313; 211 Church Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
      • List of New York State SANE Services by County
    • While there should be no hospital charge for the exam itself, there may be a charge for counseling or other medical services and, in some cases, your health insurance may be billed.
    • In the event that you choose to have a forensic exam, we strongly encourage calling the Planned Parenthood Victim Advocacy Services 24-Hour Hotline (1-866-307-4086) or the Saratoga County Wellspring Victim Services 24-Hour Hotline (518.584.8188). One of their trained staff members can attend the exam with you as your advocate, offer support, and advise you through the process, including making sure your health insurance is not billed.
    • If you don't want to utilize the advocacy services, you should let the hospital staff know that you do not want your health insurance billed for these services.
    • Planned Parenthood's Victim Advocacy Services or any Victim Assistance Program can assist you with an application to the New York State Office of Victim Services (OVS) for reimbursing out-of-pocket funds. OVS may be able to help victims/survivors in paying for health care and counseling services, including emergency funds. 
  • Sexual contact can result in Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), and can also result in pregnancy.
    • Testing for STIs is available through the counties' Public Health Services free of charge:
      • Planned Parenthood Mohawk Hudson, Glens Falls Center: 518.792.0994; 135 Warren St. Glens Falls, NY 12801
      • Warren County Public Health: 518.761.6580; Warren County Municipal Center, 1340 State Route 9, Lake George, NY 12845
      • Washington County Public Health: 518.746.2400; Washington County Annex Building, 415 Lower Main Street, ​Hudson Falls, NY 12839
      • Saratoga County Public Health: 518.584.7460, ext. 8365; Saratoga Community Health Center, 24 Hamilton Street,
        ​Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
        • Services here are free of charge but you MUST be a Saratoga County resident to utilize this clinic. Otherwise, please contact Warren or Washington County Public Health Services who will assist any SUNY Adirondack student regardless of county of residence.

 

  • Students can receive emergency contraception (commonly referred to as "the morning after pill") from the Planned Parenthood Glens Falls Center at a cost of $10.00. If you are unable to pay this amount, contact the Title IX Coordinator.

Resources for Ongoing Assistance

Below you will find information for on- and off-campus resources that can provide on-going counseling, advocacy and support following an incident of sexual violence.

Campus Resources
  • Confidential:
    • Holly Irion, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518.681.5620; irionh@sunyacc.edu; Residence Hall 161
    • Beth Braxton, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518.743.2249; braxtone@sunyacc.edu; Warren Hall 147
  • Private:
    • Counseling Center: 518.743.2278; Student Services Wing of Warren Hall
      • Seeing a SUNY Adirondack counselor is always free of charge for students. Additionally, our counselors can help you make arrangements to see an off-campus counselor free of charge for up to eight (8) sessions and on a sliding payment scale thereafter. 
    • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316
  • Protective Accommodations:
    • SUNY Adirondack is committed to ensuring the safety and well-being of reporting individuals. Following an allegation of sexual misconduct, including but not limited to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking, a student may request that certain protective accommodations be made immediately and remain in place in the interim between the report and the conclusion of the investigation and/or the accused's conduct hearing.
    • The College will work with students to meet individual requests with appropriate and reasonable accommodations as available.
    • Possible requests for accommodation include:
      • Change in academic schedule
      • Access to academic support such as tutoring services
      • The ability to withdraw from or retake a class without penalty
      • Relocation of assigned campus residence
      • Change in transportation and/or work schedules
      • Scheduled time for use of public facilities (Dining Hall, Fitness Center, etc.)
    • While we will work to mitigate the impact of these measures on both parties, it is our obligation to minimize the burden placed on the reporting individual. The College will therefore endeavor, to the extent practicable, to change the schedule or arrangements of the accused person prior to changing the arrangements of the reporting individual.
  • Other Interim Measures:
    • In situations where it is necessary, the College will take immediate steps to protect reporting individuals pending the final outcome of an investigation and/or conduct hearing. These steps include the accommodations listed above, as well as issuing No Contact Orders, temporary suspension from the College and/or Residence Hall, and denied access to the campus.
    • Please refer to the Code of Conduct for disciplinary procedures related to acts of sexual misconduct, especially those specific to reports of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.
    • Interim measures may be deemed permanent by the Dean for Student Affairs following a conduct hearing and a finding of responsibility.
    • Both the accused/respondent and the reporting individual may request a prompt review, reasonable under the circumstances and consistent with SUNY Adirondack policies and procedures, of the need for and terms of any interim measure and accommodation that directly affects him or her. Parties may submit evidence in support of their request.
    • While reporting individuals may request accommodations and interim measures through any of the offices referenced in this policy, the Title IX Coordinator will serve as the main point of contact to assist with these measures. 

 

Victim Assistance Programs Local to SUNY Adirondack

  1. State and National Organizations
  • ServJustice: A national not-for-profit organization that increased the prospect of justice for survivors by holding both perpetrators and enablers of sexual violence accountable. 
  • Legal Momentum: A national nonprofit organization that leads action for the legal rights of women. 
  • New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault: NYSCASA's member rape crisis programs provide free, confidential services including: 24/7 emergency hotline; individual counseling; support groups; advocacy and accompaniment through medical, law enforcement and court systems; information; and referrals. 
  • New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence: You can use the NYSCADV program director to find a confidential domestic violence hotline for crisis help, safety planning, emotional support, and help finding resources in your area including safe shelter, advocacy, counseling and legal assistance.
  • Pandora's Project: A nonprofit organization dedicated to providing information, support and resources to survivors of rape and sexual abuse and their friends and families. 
  • GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project: Provides free and confidential support and services for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer survivors of domestic and sexual violence through work to increase safety, security and empowerment through direct services, education and advocacy. 
  • Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN): RAINN operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline (1-800-656-4673) in partnership with more than 1,000 local sexual assault service providers across the country. 
  • Safe Horizon: Provides compassionate and expert support for people who have experienced domestic and intimate partner violence, child physical and sexual abuse, human trafficking, stalking, youth homelessness, and violent crimes committed against a family member and within communities. 

Updated: November 17, 2016

 

 

 

In accordance with the Students’ Bill of Rights, reporting individuals shall have the right to pursue one of the options below, to pursue more than one of the options below at the same time, or to choose not to participate in any of the options below:

Reporting

  • Confidentially disclose an incident to one of the SUNY Adirondack officials below who, by law, maintain confidentiality and can also assist you in accessing resources and services.
    • Holly Irion, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518-681-5620; irionh@sunyacc.edu; Residence Hall 161
    • Beth Braxton, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: 518-743-2249; braxtone@sunyacc.edu; Warren Hall 147
  • Confidentially disclose an incident to and obtain services from a county, state, or national hotline.
  • Local to SUNY Adirondack:
    • Planned Parenthood 24-Hour Rape Crisis Hotline: 1-866-307-4086
    • Domestic Violence Project 24-Hour Hotline: 518-793-9496
    • Saratoga County Wellspring Victim Services 24-Hour Hotline: 518-584-8188
  • New York State:
  • NOTE: Hotlines are for crisis intervention, resources and referrals, and their staff members are well-trained to help victims of sexual violence. However, they are services distinct from the College, meaning that hotlines do not provide SUNY Adirondack with any information. We strongly encourage you to additionally contact a campus resource so we are aware of your situation and can provide you with additional support and resources.
  • ​​Assistance can also be obtained from:
    • ServJustice: A national not-for-profit organization that increased the prospect of justice for survivors by holding both perpetrators and enablers of sexual violence accountable. 
    • Legal Momentum: A national nonprofit organization that leads action for the legal rights of women. 
    • New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault: NYSCASA's member rape crisis programs provide free, confidential services including: 24/7 emergency hotline; individual counseling; support groups; advocacy and accompaniment through medical, law enforcement and court systems; information; and referrals. 
    • New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence: You can use the NYSCADV program director to find a confidential domestic violence hotline for crisis help, safety planning, emotional support, and help finding resources in your area including safe shelter, advocacy, counseling and legal assistance.
    • Pandora's Project: A nonprofit organization dedicated to providing information, support and resources to survivors of rape and sexual abuse and their friends and families. 
    • GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project: Provides free and confidential support and services for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer survivors of domestic and sexual violence through work to increase safety, security and empowerment through direct services, education and advocacy. 
    • Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN): RAINN operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline (1-800-656-4673) in partnership with more than 1,000 local sexual assault service providers across the country. 
    • Safe Horizon: Provides compassionate and expert support for people who have experienced domestic and intimate partner violence, child physical and sexual abuse, human trafficking, stalking, youth homelessness, and violent crimes committed against a family member and within communities. 
  • Disclose the incident to one of the college officials below who will offer privacy, and can provide information about remedies, accommodations, evidence preservation, and how to obtain resources.
  • Counseling Center: 518.743.2278, Student Services Wing of Warren Hall
    • Seeing a SUNY Adirondack counselor is always free of charge to students. Additionally, our counselors can help you make arrangements to see an off-campus counselor free of charge for up to eight (8) sessions and on a sliding payment scale thereafter.
  • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu;  Scoville Learning Center Suite 316
  • Campus Public Safety: 518.743.7233; Residence Hall 164-166
  • These resources will provide the information contained in the Students’ Bill of Rights, including the right to choose when and where to report, the right to be protected by the College from retaliation, and the right to receive assistance and resources from the College.
  • These resources will disclose that they are private, not confidential, resources; they will nevertheless protect your privacy to the very best of their ability. They may still be required by law and college policy to inform certain officials, like the Title IX Coordinator, about the incident
  • These resources will notify you that the criminal justice process uses different standards of proof and evidence than college procedures, and any questions about the penal law or the criminal process should be directed to law enforcement officials or a district attorney.

 

  • File a criminal complaint with SUNY Adirondack Campus Public Safety and/or with local law enforcement and/or state police:
  • Campus Public Safety: 518.743.7233, Residence Hall 164-166, available 24 hours a day
  • Warren County Sheriff: 518.743.2500, 1400 State Route 9, Lake George, NY 12845
  • Washington County Sheriff: 518.746.2475, 399 Broadway, Fort Edward, NY 12828
  • Saratoga County Sheriff: 518.885.6761, 6010 County Farm Road, Ballston Spa, NY 12020
  • New York State Police 24-Hour Hotline to Report Sexual Assault on a New York College Campus: 844.845.7269
  • New York State Police Campus Sexual Assault Victims Unit Representative: Bill Shea, 518.783.3249, william.shea@troopers.ny.gov
  • Receive assistance from the Title IX Coordinator and/or Director of Public Safety in initiating legal proceedings in family or civil court.
  • File a report of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and/or stalking, and/or talk to the Title IX Coordinator for information and assistance.
  • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316)
  • Reports will be investigated in accordance with SUNY Adirondack policies and your identity shall remain private at all times if you wish to maintain privacy.
  • If you wish to keep your identity anonymous, you may call the Title IX Coordinator anonymously to discuss the situation and available options.
  • If you choose to engage the Campus Conduct Process, complaints will be addressed in accordance with the policies and procedures set forth in the Student Handbook and adjudicated by the Dean for Student Affairs. 
    • Dean for Student Affairs Jason Enser: 518.743.2277; enserj@sunyacc.edu; Student Center 211
  • When the accused is an employee, you may also report the incident to the SUNY Adirondack Office of Human Resources or may request that one of the above referenced confidential or private employees assist in reporting to Human Resources. Disciplinary proceedings will be conducted in accordance with applicable collective bargaining agreements.
    • Director of Human Resources Mindy Wilson: 518.743.2252, wilsonm@sunyacc.edu, Warren Hall 114
  • Complaints against an individual unaffiliated with SUNY Adirondack (i.e. an employee of an outside vendor) will be referred to the appropriate college officials who can, at your request, assist in discerning the appropriate body from which to seek disciplinary action.
    • We will also work with you to ensure your safety on our campus and provide access to appropriate resources, including assistance in obtaining a persona non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and college policy. 
  • You may withdraw your complaint or involvement from the SUNY Adirondack processes at any time.
  • At a minimum, at the first instance of your disclosure to a college official, the following information shall be presented to you:
    • “You have the right to make a report to Campus Public Safety, local law enforcement, and/or state police; to choose not to report; to report the incident to the College; to be protected by the College from retaliation for reporting an incident; and to receive assistance and resources from the College.”

Resources

  • Visit the Resources for Support section for a thorough list of on- and off-campus resources available for immediate and ongoing support.

 

Protections and Accommodations

The following protections and accommodations are available through SUNY Adirondack. Contact the Title IX Coordinator for assistance. 

  • When the accused is a student, the College can issue a “No Contact Order” consistent with college policy and procedure, meaning that for the accused to continue contacting the protected individual is a violation of college policy subject to additional conduct charges.
  • If the accused and protected person observe each other in a public place, it is the responsibility of the accused to leave the area in a reasonable time and manner without directly contacting the protected person. 
  • If appropriate, the College may establish a schedule for parties seeking to use the same facilities without running afoul of the No Contact Order. 
  • Both the accused person and the reporting individual may request a prompt review, reasonable under the circumstances and consistent with SUNY Adirondack policies and procedures, of the need for and terms of a No Contact Order, including requests to modify the terms of or discontinue the Order. Parties may submit evidence in support of their request to the Dean for Student Affairs.
    • Dean for Student Affairs Jason Enser: 518.743.2277; enserj@sunyacc.edu; Student Center 211
  • Assistance from SUNY Adirondack Public Safety and the Title IX Coordinator in initiating legal proceedings in family or civil court, including but not limited to obtaining an Order of Protection or, if outside of New York State, an equivalent protective or restraining order.
  • A copy of the Order of Protection or equivalent, and an opportunity to meet or speak with a college official, or to be connected with an outside resource, who can explain the order and answer questions about it, including an explanation of the consequences for violating these orders (including but not limited to arrest, additional conduct charges, and temporary suspension) and information from the Order about the accused’s responsibility to stay away from the protected person(s), as that burden does not rest on the protected person(s).
  • Director of Public Safety Rick Conine: 518.743.7791; coniner@sunyacc.edu; Warren Hall 003
  • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316. 
  • Assistance from Campus Public Safety in effecting an arrest when an individual violates an Order of Protection or, if outside New York State, an equivalent protective or restraining order within the jurisdiction of SUNY Adirondack Public Safety or, if outside of the jurisdiction of SUNY Adirondack Public Safety, to call on and assist local law enforcement in effecting an arrest for violating such an order.    
  • When the accused is a student and presents a continuing threat to the health and safety of the community, to have the accused subject to temporary suspension pending the outcome of a conduct process.
  • Both the accused person and the reporting individual may request a prompt review, reasonable under the circumstances and consistent with SUNY Adirondack policies and procedures, of the need for and terms of a temporary suspension, including requests to modify the terms of or discontinue the suspension. Parties may submit evidence in support of their request to the Dean for Student Affairs.
    • Dean for Student Affairs Jason Enser: 518.743.2277; enserj@sunyacc.edu; Student Center 211
  • When the accused is not a student but is a member of the college community and presents a continuing threat to the health and safety of the community, to subject the accused to interim measures in accordance with applicable collective bargaining agreements, employee handbooks and SUNY Adirondack policies and rules.
  • When the accused is not a member of the college community, to have assistance from SUNY Adirondack Public Safety or other college officials in obtaining a persona non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and College policy.
  • To obtain reasonable and available interim protective measures and accommodations that effect a change in academic, housing, employment, transportation, or other applicable arrangements in order to ensure safety, prevent retaliation, and avoid an ongoing hostile environment.
  • Both the accused person and the reporting individual may request a prompt review, reasonable under the circumstances and consistent with SUNY Adirondack policies and procedures, of the need for and terms of any interim measure and accommodation that directly affects him or her. Parties may submit evidence in support of their request to the Dean for Student Affairs or the Title IX Coordinator.
    • Dean for Student Affairs Jason Enser: 518.743.2277; enserj@sunyacc.edu; Student Center 211
    • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316
  • While reporting individuals may request accommodations through any of the offices referenced in this policy, the Title IX Coordinator will serve as the main point of contact to assist with these measures.
    • Title IX Coordinator Tressie LaFay: 518.743.2319; lafayt@sunyacc.edu; Scoville Learning Center Suite 316

 

Student Conduct Process

You may request that student conduct charges be filed against the accused. Conduct proceedings are governed by the procedures set forth in the SUNY Adirondack Student Handbook as well as federal and New York state law, including the due process provisions of the United States and New York State Constitutions.

Throughout conduct proceedings, the respondent and the reporting individual will have:

  • The same opportunity to be accompanied by an advisor of their choice who may assist and advise the parties throughout the conduct process and any related hearings or meetings.
  • Participation of the advisor in any proceeding is governed by federal law and the Student Code of Conduct.
  • Per SUNY Adirondack’s Code of Conduct, advisors may speak with their respective advisees during hearings and/or meetings, and advisees may request a brief recess from the hearing to consult with their advisor. However, advisors may not participate in the hearing or meeting process, i.e. by asking questions directly to college officials, attempting to present evidence, or speaking on behalf of their advisee.
  • Any advisor who does not abide by these instructions will be asked to leave at the discretion of the Dean for Student Affairs.   
  • The right to a prompt response to any complaint, and to have the complaint investigated and adjudicated in an impartial, timely, and thorough manner by individuals who receive annual training in conducting investigations of sexual violence, the effects of trauma, impartiality, the rights of the respondent (including the right to a presumption that the respondent is “not responsible” until a finding of responsibility is made) and other issues related to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.
  • The right to an investigation and process conducted in a manner that recognizes the legal and policy requirements of due process, including fairness, impartiality, and a meaningful opportunity to be heard, and is not conducted by individuals with a conflict of interest.
  • The right to receive advance written or electronic notice of the date, time, and location of any meeting or hearing they are required to or are eligible to attend. Accused individuals will also be told the factual allegations concerning the violation, a reference to the specific Code of Conduct provisions alleged to have been violated, and possible sanctions.
  • The right to have a conduct process run concurrently with a criminal justice investigation and proceeding, except for temporary delays as requested by external municipal entities while law enforcement gathers evidence.
  • Temporary delays should not last more than 10 days except when law enforcement specifically requests and justifies a longer delay.
  • The right to offer evidence during an investigation and to review available relevant evidence in the case file (or otherwise held by SUNY Adirondack).
  • The right to present evidence and testimony at a hearing, where appropriate.
  • The right to a range of options for providing testimony via alternative arrangements, including telephone/videoconferencing or testifying with a room partition.
  • The right to exclude prior sexual history with persons other than the other party in the conduct process or their own mental health diagnosis or treatment from admittance in the college disciplinary stage that determines responsibility.
  • Past findings of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault may be admissible in the disciplinary stage that determines sanction. 
  • The right to ask questions of the decision maker and via the decision maker indirectly request responses from other parties and any other witnesses present.
  • The right to make an impact statement during the point of the proceeding where the decision maker is deliberating on appropriate sanctions.
  • The right to simultaneous (among the parties) written or electronic notification of the outcome of a conduct proceeding, including the decisions, sanction(s) (if any), and rationale.
  • For students found responsible for sexual assault, the available sanctions are suspension with additional requirements and dismissal.
  • For crimes of violence, including but not limited to sexual violence, defined as crimes that meet the reporting requirements pursuant to the federal Clery Act, students who are suspended or dismissed from the College after a finding of responsibility of a Code of Conduct violation will have a notation made on their transcript that they were "suspended after a finding of responsibility for a Code of Conduct violation" or "dismissed after a finding of responsibility for a Code of Conduct violation."
    • For more information, please see the full Transcript Notation Policy in the College Catalog.  
  • Access to at least one level of appeal of a determination before a panel, which may include one or more students, that is fair and impartial and does not include individuals with a conflict of interest.
  • The right to have access to a full and fair record of a student conduct hearing, which shall be preserved and maintained for at least five years.
  • These records will be kept in the office of the Dean for Student Affairs, 518.743.2277, Student Center 211.
  • The right to choose whether to disclose or discuss the outcome of a conduct hearing. However, it should be noted that this does not allow students to unreasonably share private information in a manner intended to harm or embarrass another individual, or in a manner that would recklessly do so regardless of intention. Such sharing may be retaliation, which can result in separate charges under the Code of Conduct.
  • The right to have all information obtained during the course of the conduct or judicial process be protected from public release until the appeals panel makes a final determination, unless otherwise required by law.

Updated: November 17, 2016